I just stumbled upon this StackOverflow post while checking out Vue 3 and this new syntax and Composition API and so on and getting to the point where I was ready to add a Vuex store.

In Vue 2…

…populating a component with properties from store getters looked like this:

In Vue 3…

…according to the docs, it looks like this and with the <script setup> syntax it looks…


Useful knowledge when working with long texts.

This article is for those who don’t want to become an expert but get the maximum reward with minimum effort. The internet is full of tutorials on the topic and there are already lots of really good resources. I will list some of them at the bottom. The “problem” I see is that they are mostly not really targeted at non-technical users. They try to explain everything in one article. You read the first few paragraphs and think: “Well… Some other day, maybe.”

The goal of this article is that you can easily read it to the end, understand everything…


This article assumes some basic experience with GitHub Actions/Workflows.

When you work with GitHub Actions, you have almost infinite flexibility at your disposal and you can do almost anything. But sometimes you have to be a bit creative to achieve what you want.

Within a workflow, jobs are executed in parallel but you can create dependencies between jobs so that they run consecutively. Steps within a job always run one after another.

Workflows themselves always run independently of each other. You can trigger the same workflow multiple times and there will be multiple parallel runs. That’s perfectly fine in many…


Or… When you’re working on a static site and GitHub Pages feels like the perfect hosting solution, since you like having everything in one place and then you realize you need an additional environment but you still don’t want to use anything but GitHub… Here’s what you can do.

This is a “special needs” article but also a general introduction to GitHub Actions.

Since the advent of Single Page Applications the requirements for hosting have been reduced to a minimum. Anything that can serve a static HTML file will do the job just fine and the browser, bombarded with Javascript, does the heavy lifting. High availability and security is a totally different topic of course but in this case I believe GitHub has you covered.

With Pages GitHub offers a very convenient service for hosting such an app. You push to your repository and GitHub updates the deployment for…


The problem covered in this article has been discussed for some time now: https://github.com/isaacs/github/issues/408 Unfortunately there’s still no real solution and a workaround is needed.

GitHub Pages is a super convenient hosting service for static sites, e.g. a personal portfolio or blog or a project’s documentation and even modern web apps are in many cases not much more than a static HTML file and (a lot of) Javascript. But static sites come with the downside of… well… being static. That means you can’t have dynamic routes, like your-project.github.io/posts/<post-slug> where <post-slug> is a dynamic parameter. All possible routes need to be…

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